Saturday, November 15, 2008

Aquinas' Division of Aristotle's Physics


Share/Bookmark From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book I, Lecture 2:

Having completed the preface in which it was shown that natural science ought to begin with the more universal principles, here, according to the order already stated, he begins to pursue those matters which pertain to natural science.

This discussion is divided into two parts. In the first part he treats the universal principles of natural science. In the second part he treats mobile being in common [which is the subject of the science].’ This is taken up in Book III, where he says, ‘Nature has been defined ...’ (200 b 12; L1).

The first part is divided into two parts. First he treats the principles of the subject of this science, that is, the principles of mobile being as such (Book I). Secondly he treats the principles of the science. This he does in Book II, where he says, ‘Of things that exist...’ (192 b 8; L1).


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book II, Lecture 1:

After the Philosopher has treated the principles of natural things in Book I, he here treats the principles of natural science.

Now the things which we ought to know first in any science are its subject [in this case, nature or mobile being] and the method by which it demonstrates [in this case, the four causes].


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book III, Lecture 1:

The treatment [of the subject of the science], then, is divided into two parts:

In the first he concludes with respect to motion in itself (Books III-VI);

In the second he concludes with respect to motion in relation to movers [things moving others] and things movable [things which others move] (Book VII).

The first part is divided into two:

He concludes in regard to motion itself (Books III-IV);

He concludes in regard to its parts (Books V-VI).


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book IV, Lecture 1:

After treating in Book III of motion, and the infinite, which belongs intrinsically to motion insofar as it is in the genus of continuous things, the Philosopher now intends, in Book IV, to deal with the things that are extrinsically connected with motion (place, the void, and time).


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book V, Lecture 1:

After discussing motion and the things that accompany motion in general, the Philosopher now undertakes to give various divisions of motion. And his treatment falls into two parts:

In the first he divides motion into its species [Book V];
In the second he divides motion into quantitative parts in Book VI.


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book VI, Lecture 1:

After the Philosopher has finished dividing motion into its species and discussing the unity and contrariety of motions and of states of rest, he proposes in this Sixth Book to discuss the things that pertain to the division of motion precisely as it is divisible into quantitative parts.


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book VII, Lecture 1:

After discussing motion in itself, and the concomitants of motion, and the division of motion into parts, in the preceding books (III-VI), the Philosopher now begins to treat of motion in its relationship to movers and things moved, i.e., the mobiles. The treatment falls into two parts:

In the first he shows that there is a first motion and a first mover (Book VII);
In the second he investigates the properties of the first motion and of the first mover, in Book VIII.


From Aquinas' Commentary on Aristotle's Physics, Book VIII, Lecture 1:

After showing in the preceding book that it is necessary to posit a first mobile, and a first motion, and a first mover, the Philosopher intends in this present book to inquire after a description of the first mover, and first motion, and first mobile...
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